Food Allergy Parenting

budget-allergy-parenting

We are a food allergy family.

Our daughter, Eva, was diagnosed at twenty months old with severe allergies to peanuts, tree nuts, sunflower, and pet dander. The diagnosis sent us reeling in shock because we never expected it. I have food allergies and my husband has mild food intolerances, but nothing so dangerous as what we now had to look out for with our kid.

Since her diagnosis, we’ve adapted and learned about living with food allergies. Although the outlook isn’t quite as grim as it seemed on that first night, we’ve had our fair share of serious scares and I’m hoping that our trials and errors will help other parents who are embarking on the same journey. The good news is that we’ve been delighted by all of the support and resources we’ve found online and many things that seemed impossible to manage are now things we handle every day. There is hope!

// Allergy Articles //
Our Toddler is Allergic to Peanuts: The Pediatric Allergy Test
The First Nut-Free Weekend
The Day I Poisoned Eva (an update on being nut-free)
Our First ER Trip After an Allergic Reaction to Peanuts
Six Months Into Living with Food Allergies: An Update
Parenting Food Allergies: Eva’s Second Pediatric Allergy Test
Food Allergies aren’t Fancy: Allergy Parenting on a Budget

// Allergy Holidays //
Getting Ready for Our Nut-Free Halloween
Nut-Free Friday: Strawberry Santa Cakes
Nut-Free Valentine’s Day: Inside-Out Candy Boxes with Airheads
Halloween Really is the Scariest Holiday
Nut-Free Christmas: Eva Finally Gets Christmas Candy (A Review of Vermont Nut Free Chocolates)

// Allergy Travel //
I Just Ruined Peanut Time For Everyone

// Nut-free Recipes //
Nut-Free Friday: Pizza
Use Fondant Cutters for Toddler ABC Snacks #allergyfree

Allergy Parenting Posts:
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5 thoughts on “Food Allergy Parenting

  1. I have a tree nut/peanut allergy. I have had it since I was a child. My mom found out when I had a PB&J sandwich at school (I had never had anything nut related to eat before). Almonds are the worst for me. You learn to avoid them as you get older. It will get easier for her.

  2. Oh my goodness—reading through your posts with tears in my eyes! This rings so true for me. My not quite 1 year old was diagnosed with many allergies at 9 months—soy and wheat (which we believe to be false positives, he is still eating those), eggs, lentils, garbanzos, sesame, peanuts, and tree nuts. He has not had an anaphylactic reaction to any of them, but has had severe hives anywhere the foods come in contact with his skin! We hope to learn about the severity of the allergies so we can either worry more or relax a little bit. It’s so hard not knowing! Thank you for sharing your family’s stories—it’s so helpful to hear from others!

    • I’m so sorry that you guys have such a list! I know that early diagnosis means that he may grow out of them so I’ve got my fingers crossed for you guys. And even if it is a potential anaphylactic situation, I’m more often surprised at how caring and supportive people are than at how hard it is for us to provide normalcy. Hope on the horizon!

  3. As a mother of a child with severe anaphylactic food allergies, reading your story about Ava starting school provokes anxiety in me… I don’t think that anxiety will ever fully subside, but I want you to know that it IS POSSIBLE to send her to regular school and still have her be safe!!! My daughter has severe anaphylactic allergies (contact as well as oral) to milk, peanuts, tree nuts and uncooked eggs and I am happy to report that she has never had more than a mild reaction at school!!! With that being said, it would NEVER be a possibility if I weren’t the bold, vigilante that my daughter needs me to be. I am that mom that you were talking about, that demands her bubble remain intact under any and all circumstances. I have meetings every summer with her new teacher/ the school nurse/ and the principal in order to ensure that everyone fully understands the situation, and that we have a plan in place for EVERY scenario. For instance, we found out that this school year the kids would be eating lunch IN their classrooms due to overcrowding of the school. Even with kids eating in a separate lunch room and washing their hands before coming back into the classroom there are risks…. and now I’m hearing that the food is suppose to be brought INTO the classroom!!! There was NO possible way that Lauren could go to school under those circumstances. So we spent a good 2 hrs going over different options, with the only safe one being that she eats alone in the classroom with her teacher, and the rest of the kids go into another teachers classroom to eat. While it makes me sad for her, I’ll take sadness over safety hazard any day of the week!! I take over every class party the whole year and provide the food for everyone. Birthdays are celebrated with non food treat bags, and her teacher texts me on a very regular basis to ask questions…… but it IS HAPPENING!!! She is experiencing that aspect of life that you were talking about… regular, public school!! She deals with the anxiety sometimes too. Not so much out of fear because she knows mom’s taken care of all that. For her it’s more separation anxiety just due to the fact that with kids like this we as moms DO have to be right there every second when they are little and I think it forms a very close bond between us. While nobody could tell you what situation is right for your family, I just wanted to encourage you that IF public school is what you want, and IF you’re willing to be bold….. it CAN work. 🙂 From watching Ava’s video she reminds me a lot of Lauren. An old wise soul in a miniature body, sweet as pie, and more optimistic that maybe they even should be! Good luck!! It will never be easy for families like ours, but it IS worth it!

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